Which countries have the most productive agriculture

Europe's top 5: organic farming is booming in these countries

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Eurostat statistics on Wednesday, October 26th, 2016 - 3:45 pm (comment now)

In the past five years, organic farming in the EU has increased by 21%. In some countries the area under organic farming has quadrupled. These are the front runners.

Organic farming in Europe is on the upswing. How the figures changed from 2010 to 2015 and where the focus is on organic - these are the figures from the European statistical agency Eurostat. In 2015 around 6.2 percent of all arable land in the EU was used for organic farming. In 2010 it was 5.1 percent. There are also more producers: in 2015 there were 271,500 organic farmers registered in the EU - 5.4 percent more than in 2014. But which European countries are ahead?

Top 5: The largest organic cultivation areas

The front runners in the total area of ‚Äč‚Äčorganic agriculture in 2015 are:

  • Spain: 1,968,570 ha
  • Italy: 1,492,579 ha
  • France: 1,361,512 ha
  • Germany: 1,060,291 ha
  • Poland: 580,731 ha

The situation is different in percentage terms, i.e. in terms of the share of organic agriculture in total agriculture. Here these countries lead:

  • Austria: 20.3%
  • Sweden: 17.1%
  • Estonia: 15.7%
  • Czech Republic: 13.7%
  • Italy and Latvia: 12% each

Top 5: The biggest increases in organic farming

At EU level, the area under organic cultivation increased by 21% in 2015 compared to 2010 and amounted to just over 11 million hectares, with the historic value of 10 million hectares being reached in 2012. These countries recorded the greatest increases in area from 2010 to 2015:

  • Croatia: + 376.9%, from 15,913 to 75,883 ha
  • Bulgaria: + 362.2%, from 25,648 to 118,552 ha
  • France: + 61%, from 845,442 to 1,361,512 ha
  • Ireland: + 53%, from 47,864 to 73,037 ha
  • Lithuania: +49%, from 143,644 to 213,579 ha

How eco is Germany?

In 2015, 1,060,291 hectares were farmed organically in Germany. That is 6.3% of the total area and thus in percentage terms in the European average. In 2010 it was 7% less, namely 990,702 ha.

With material from Eurostat

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