What are the benefits of lip kissing

Schmusekur: Why kissing is so beautiful and healthy

As many studies show, deep kissing has a number of health benefits and works like a cure: for the immune system, for the heart, against stress, against pain, even with hay fever. By Mag. Alexandra Wimmer

Relationship test and celebration

Karl Farkas was not entirely correct when he said that a kiss was “the exchange of bacterial cultures, but not for research purposes”. Because unconsciously, the first kiss with a potential partner is being researched: Does the other one taste good to me? Does he or she suit me? Once this has been clarified, deep kissing also helps to maintain the relationship and ignites passion: In the course of a study, the sexologist Prof. Dr. Ernest Bornemann prove that when the tongue and lips kiss intensely, nerve impulses are sent directly to the sexual organs.

Pure relaxation

At the moment when lips and tongues touch, a real cocktail of hormones pours over us: Serotonin, dopamine, adrenaline, endorphins and the bonding hormone oxytocin are released, the stress hormone cortisol is switched off. You feel relaxed and comfortable. Some researchers even suggest that kissing can prevent depression. In addition: the "flooding" with adrenaline and dopamine inhibits the sensation of pain.

Facelift

The skin is also happy about the caresses on the lips and tongue: When kissing, around 30 facial muscles are activated, so that kissing counteracts wrinkles. In addition, the skin of the face is supplied with blood more intensely when you cuddle - this refreshes and tightens.

(Lip) work-out

With the intensive play of the tongue you even do something for the slim line: You burn up to 20 calories per minute for each passionate French kiss. After all, kissing is almost a work-out in which, in addition to the facial muscles, the muscles of the neck and back are also activated. This prevents the noses from clashing while cuddling.

Heart and lung turbo

It not only makes our heart beat faster, but also faster: Cuddling puts the cardiovascular system in positive stress. The pump beats up to 150 times per minute when kissing; this strengthens the heart muscle, the pumping capacity of the heart is improved. The lungs are also trained: Instead of around 20, we take 60 breaths per minute - breathing becomes more intensive and the oxygen supply improved.

Blood pressure and cholesterol lowering drugs

As hormone experts at the Vienna University Clinic found, kissing can counteract cardiovascular problems. If you regularly and intensely cuddle for at least three minutes, high blood pressure drops and LDL cholesterol levels improve.

Immune training

According to scientists, cuddling works like a kind of oral vaccination: As the Dutch microbiologist Remco Kort and his team have now found out, around 80 million bacteria are transmitted when kissing deeply with the tongue; this has a positive effect on the body's defenses: the immune system activates defense cells that are supposed to render the bacteria harmless. But there is no light without shadow: Unfortunately, the saliva can also contain bacteria and viruses that are harmful to health, so that diseases such as herpes, hepatitis or Pfeiffer's glandular fever are passed on; Diseases of the stomach (e.g. stomach ulcers) can be transmitted via the Helicobacter pylori bacterium.

Hay fever cure

According to a study, passionate kisses can relieve hay fever. The Japanese allergist Hajime Kimata examined the immune values ​​of almost 50 hay fever sufferers: after they had kissed their partners for 30 minutes, significantly fewer allergen antibodies and histamines were found in the blood.
 
The finest anti-aging

Those who kiss a lot have particularly good cards in terms of both quality of life and lifespan. Canadian doctors at McGill University in Montreal have found that not only are they more resilient to many diseases, they also age more slowly. A study by the American Society for Sexual Behavior in Los Angeles showed that those who kiss a lot live up to five years longer.

Status 03/2015