Mexican men love black women

Ideal of beautyNo Afro on the Magazine cover

The fashion magazine Grazia simply retouched the naturally frizzy hairstyle of actress Lupita Nyongo’o on its November cover.

"There are few black women who wear their Afro hair naturally," says Deutschlandfunk-Nova author Alice Hasters. She herself has German and African American roots and has been teased many times because of her hair.

"I straightened my hair for the first time when I was in the US when I was 16. I went to high school for a year in 2006. Back then it was very unusual for a black girl to have hair not straight."
Alice Hasters, Deutschlandfunk Nova author

On the November cover picture of "Grazia", ​​on which Lupita Nyongo’o can be seen, her hairstyle was retouched. The Kenyan-Mexican actress' curly ponytail can no longer be seen on it. This is because the frizzy hairstyles of black people do not correspond to the current ideal of beauty, according to our colleague Alice Hasters.

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On the magazine cover, it now looks as if Lupita Nyong’o has a short haircut and her hair is straight against her head. But that means that afro hair is just not beautiful in its frizzy state, says our reporter.

"Wigs and synthetic hair for black women - it's a huge industry. Nobody spends more money on hair than black women."
Alice Hasters, Deutschlandfunk Nova author

Anyone looking for black women today who wear their Afro hair naturally, in a curly, frizzy state - realizes that there are very few. Beyoncé, Rihanna or Naomi Campbell. "They not only straighten them, their real hair cannot be seen at all. They are hidden under wigs or human hair extensions called" weaves ", explains our reporter.

"Beyonce sure doesn't have long straight blonde hair."
Alice Hasters, Deutschlandfunk Nova author

In order to suppress the cultural customs of black people, they had to cut their hair very short in the USA during the colonial days, recalls Alice Hasters.

Straight hair as a status symbol

In addition, the fair-skinned with little frills were often better-off slaves. This continued even after the end of slavery, says Alice Hasters: "The closer people came to a European ideal of beauty, the more likely they were to be socially accepted in the USA."

Through the American civil rights movement in the 1970s, the Afro hairstyle also became a symbol of rebellion and rebellion. Many black people wanted to avoid this impression, which means that typical braided hairstyles or dreadlocks are sometimes banned in private schools to this day.

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