Canada has a shortage of engineers

Forum: Training, Studies & Career Emigrating to Canada as an engineer is an option?





Hello! Has anyone already emigrated from the forum to Canada and can give tips? a. Which English speaking regions can you recommend? Unfortunately, my French is not that good. b. Will the FRG actually pay the pension over there later? c. How do you get along there? d. How / where did you find a job? e. You did the interview first via Skype and then came an on-site visit that you noticed during your vacation days? f. What have you got out of it, can you handle it? Thanks!


Do you have or do you want children? I know a few Canadian families because my daughter was there for six months (New Brunswick, East Coast). The people there are very friendly. Work: More like in the USA. But the kids start to work at 15 at the latest during the holidays so that they can later afford university. And still have some $ 10,000 in debt after graduation. Or rich parents



The advantage & disadvantage in Canada: extremely strong unions. The disadvantage, if you want to do a job quickly, there is nothing with fast. The advantage when you are stressed out quickly. The well-being of the trade unionist is an absolute priority. If you can only do two loops a day without stress, it will take as long as it takes. Ah. Yes, CSA is not like CE, self-certified. But make it effective. Have the tests done. Full documentation, full tests. Nothing goes below 10k euros. So better do something else. e.g. trappers, lumberjacks, gold seekers, tour guides, oil seekers, toxic waste diggers,

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I join the blackbird. I'm interested in that too! However, also generally in terms of the work situation. Not just in terms of engineers. I think I heard years ago that Canada (as in Germany) also has a shortage of qualified craftsmen. Because so many are studying. I can well imagine that for the metropolitan areas. Can anyone verify that?

of Model maker too (Guest)


First of all, you should note that you are only allowed to work as an engineer if you are registered with the APEGS. This requires a large number of documents, which are not always easy to obtain, and one to three years of time.



Udo S. wrote:> I know a few Canadian families because my daughter was there for six months> (New Brunswick, East Coast).> The people there are very friendly. Work: More like in the USA. >> But the kids start to work at the latest at the age of 15 during the holidays, in order to> be able to afford the university later. And still have some 10,000 dollars in debt after graduation. Yes, I also know the debt mentality when it comes to studying from the USA. Well, maybe. you'd better go to the university here in D-Land first and then we'll go over there.


Blackbird wrote:> Well, maybe. better go to the> university here in Germany and then we'll go over there. From a moral point of view, however, more so .. "well" .. is ..



Alex G. wrote:> From a moral point of view, however, it is more ... "well" .. As long as the parents work here, pay taxes and contribute to the social security system, I see no problem. The change from private to statutory health insurance, which is still possible, strikes me a lot more. Just like the fact that capital income is taxed less than your salary once you make good money. Or that companies almost always get away with it, keyword Amazon / VAT, diesel scandal / VW, Cum-Ex, ... Big keyword: corporate criminal law and dozens of other topics.



Alex G. wrote:> Amsel wrote: >> Well, maybe. rather go to the D-country first >> Uni and then we go over.> Which is morally more so .. "well" .. .. Much more serious are the missing KK contributions that are not paid in Germany during you are in Canada and then you come back in old age to take advantage of free medical care.



Cyblord -. wrote:> Alex G. wrote: >> Amsel wrote: >>> Well, maybe. rather go to the D-Land first here >>> Uni and then we go over. >> What morally, however, is more so .. "well" .. >> The missing KK contributions weigh much more heavily in Germany not paid> while in Canada and then come back in old age> to receive free medical care. Not free of charge, but comparatively cheap, of course. Whereby it is (after all) not that easy to get into the (statutory) health insurance of the pensioners, so you should expect about 19% -20% contribution KV + PV on all income in this case. We only recently had the discussion on the topic of private health insurance: What would happen if "everyone" did it? Right, the (statutory) KV (or analogously the German education system) would go bankrupt or would have to be cross-financed by a few with exorbitantly high taxes / duties. Morally questionable anyway. MfG, Arno



Arno wrote:> Not free, but comparatively cheap, of course, is true. Where> (after all) it is not that easy to get into the (statutory)> health insurance of the pensioners, with approx. 19% -20% contribution KV + PV> on all income you should count in this case. Doesn't even have to be a pensioner. You can easily pay no contributions for 20 years because you live abroad and then take up a job here in Germany and you are legally insured. Then you save exactly the time in which you only pay in and need little.

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You have to get recognized in the professional association. Nobody else is allowed to call themselves an engineer in kanda. The profession is protected even harder than here. https://engineerscanada.ca/



Thomas1 wrote:> The profession is protected even harder than here. "Even harder" implies that he is already hard protected here. Ridiculous.



Thomas1 wrote:> Nobody else is allowed to call themselves an engineer in kanda. I thought an engineer is someone who operates an engine. So e.g. a train driver. :-)



French Topic: Only relevant in the Montreal and Quebec regions. I was often in Toronto on business for weeks - only at the airport you can find a few French signs.



Harald W. wrote:> I thought an engineer is someone who operates a machine. So e.g. a train driver. :-) As you can see, in the future leave the thinking to the horses, they have bigger heads.


A question - emigrating to Canada as an option for what? To emigrate to Angola, USA, China, Brexitania, ...? Why emigrate at all? What is your motivation?



Ontarian wrote:> Only at the airport do you find a few French signs. ... but also English or not?



Harald W. wrote:> Ontarian wrote: >>> Only at the airport do you find a few French signs. >> ... but also in English or not? So I've been to BC and Alberta and everything was always bilingual there. All signs, all imprints on packaging, etc. Most of the time, of course, only English was spoken.



Udo S. wrote:> But the kids start to work at 15 at the latest during the holidays in order to> be able to afford the university later. And still have some 10,000 dollars in debt after graduation. In Germany they have less debt, but no job.



Achim wrote:> In Germany they have less debts, but no job. Yes, yes, there is always something to be found, if necessary in an unrelated way.



Harald W. wrote:> I thought an engineer is someone who operates a machine. So e.g. a train driver. :-) No, you're confusing that. As an engineer, you just shovel the coals in the back of the big monster at the top so that it continues to produce a lot of hot air. As a train driver, on the other hand, you are even paid for it.