Why is it never discussed in Scotland?

Independence in sight - Scotland wants another referendum - the most important questions

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After a clear victory by the Greens and the Scottish National Party, a constitutional dispute with London threatens.

Author: Henriette Engbersen

After a clear victory by the Greens and the Scottish National Party, both of which stand for Scotland's independence, the Scottish government wants to force another referendum. There is a threat of a constitutional dispute with London. Here are the three most important questions and answers.

Why can't the Scots just vote on their independence? The Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon of the Scottish National Party (SNP) has announced that it will seek a referendum in the first half of its five-year legislature - the year 2023 is mentioned in many media. But the constitutional authority over whether the Scots can vote or not has the British Parliament in London. Boris Johnson's party currently holds a majority in parliament and Johnsons has made it clear that he will say no to another referendum. Nicola Sturgeon has always stated that she does not want to hold an unconstitutional referendum, as, for example, Catalonia had done.

Why might the courts decide on the independence referendum? Sturgeon (SNP) does not want to accept a no from the British government without further ado. She plans to propose a bill for a referendum in the Scottish Parliament. Here, the SNP, together with the Greens, holds the majority of the seats. The Greens have also clearly spoken out in favor of a new independence referendum and therefore this law would probably be adopted. If the UK government then continues to insist on the no, Sturgeon could take this constitutional issue to the Supreme Court.

Johnson invites Sturgeon to meet up

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson wrote a letter to the Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon calling on them to work together and invited them to a meeting at which the heads of the other parts of Wales and Northern Ireland should also take part. "I have a passionate belief that the interests of the people of the UK, and especially the people of Scotland, are best served when we work together," wrote Johnson. The benefit of this cooperation was particularly evident in the corona pandemic. "This is Team United Kingdom in action," said Johnson.

Would the Scots say yes to another independence vote? In 2014, 55 percent of Scottish voters said no to independence. But as a result of Brexit, the polls for independence in 2020 rose significantly and reached historically high values ​​in autumn with up to 58 percent approval. These are higher values ​​than in 2014 before the last vote. In the last few months, however, the no-share in the population has caught up again, so that opponents and supporters are roughly on par at the moment. So if another vote takes place, the outcome would be highly uncertain.

SRF 4 News, May 9, 2021, 7:00 a.m.

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  • Comment from Matt Frei (sense against mainstream)
    The Scots cannot leave themselves, for the same reasons that the Catalans cannot leave or the Canton of Jura. You joined the state and not a federation - everyone knows the difference from history class.
    Agree agree to the comment
    1. answer from Daniel Häberlin (Svensk)
      Scotland did not simply join the British Union of its own free will. First, the Scottish King James VI. also crowned king in England, from then on the two countries were ruled in personal union. In the 17th century, while trying to establish a colony in Panama, Scotland got so heavily into debt that it was forced to enter into a real union with England in order to prevent national bankruptcy. The population was never questioned about this.
      Agree agree to the comment
    2. answer from Maria Müller (Mmueller)
      State borders defined by human hands have seldom been set in stone.

      Separating national territories (or wanting to) is NOT an absolute no-go. Something like that happens occasionally. And as long as it takes place peacefully, there is nothing wrong with it, but it is an expression of democratic self-determination.

      (No matter whether in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Montenegro or just: Catalonia.)
      Agree agree to the comment
    3. answer from Matt Frei (sense against mainstream)
      @ Häberlin
      ... the poor! So the population could not express itself through our current democracy ideas? Now is the time to appeal to this 300 year old injustice.
      That’s why the USA is now ceding California to Mexico again :-)
      Agree agree to the comment
    4. answer from Matt Frei (sense against mainstream)
      @ Müller
      ... is peaceful. The majority represented in the UK Parliament said no.
      Agree agree to the comment
    5. answer from Daniel Häberlin (Svensk)
      Mr. Frei, stay matter-of-fact! I wanted to show that the situation in Scotland cannot be compared with that of the Swiss cantons. Switzerland is a "willing nation" to which most (not all) cantons have voluntarily joined. Scotland, on the other hand, had almost no choice but to join forces with England due to the threat of national bankruptcy. Ireland, which has been independent for exactly 100 years, also belonged to this union.
      Agree agree to the comment
    6. answer from Javier López (Javier López)
      @D. Häberlin

      Referendum:
      The peoples or regions affected were never asked when they were attacked by the Catalans and Catalan was forced on them.
      The separatists are very proud wherever Catalan is spoken. They don't seem to have a problem with that.
      Example: Alghero in Sardinia, Balearic Islands, etc.

      Quote:
      "... the language spread to the south and east in the course of the conquests of the Catalan-Aragonese kings."

      Pure hypocrisy!
      Agree agree to the comment
    7. answer from Daniel Häberlin (Svensk)
      And since you are opening the barrel with the secession of militarily conquered territories through referendums: that has happened umpteen times in history. North Schleswig (conquered by Germany in 1864) voted in 1920 to return to Denmark. Lower Carinthia, which was occupied by Yugoslavia, voted to remain with Austria in 1920. And yes, I think if a US state actually wants to secede and / or change citizenship, it should be allowed to vote on it.
      Agree agree to the comment
    8. answer from Daniel Häberlin (Svensk)
      Mr López, you compare apples with pears. Will Sardinia and the Balearic Islands be ruled from Catalonia today? No. Is Catalan the official language in Sardinia today? No, it's not even a recognized minority language there. Is Spanish banned in the Balearic Islands? No, it is absolutely equal to Catalan there. On the other hand, Catalan was forbidden in French-speaking Spain. Language policy and territorial policy are not always the same, by the way.
      Agree agree to the comment
    9. Show answers
  • Comment from Udo Gerschler (UG)
    Can Catalonia then also split off from Spain?
    Agree agree to the comment
    1. answer from Javier López (Javier López)
      The answer: no.

      The Spanish constitution does not allow this.
      The German constitution does not allow such a thing either. Therefore Bavaria cannot part with D.
      The Swiss constitution also does not allow a canton to be split off from Switzerland.

      For a spin-off, the constitutional and legal requirements must first be created.

      In the UK, the court will have to decide now.

      Is that understandable?
      Agree agree to the comment
    2. answer from Maria Müller (Mmueller)
      Mr. Lopez:
      If in a province / area or similar a majority of people think they want to become FREE AND INDEPENDENT, then that has to be respected. Because freedom and self-determination are among the highest (!) Political goods of all humanity.

      The Serbian constitution / government was also against Kosovo becoming independent. And??

      Therefore, one should (freely) admit this to the Catalans in order to enable a peaceful political divorce. As in the Czech Republic / Slovakia.
      Agree agree to the comment
    3. Show answers
  • Comment from Maria Müller (Mmueller)
    The Scots will think very carefully about whether they want to move from the UK to the EU.

    Because then all of a sudden the annual flow of money from London ceases. And have to be compensated from Brussels.
    And they have enough savings problems themselves.
    Agree agree to the comment

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