How can you successfully date a feminist

The new women's movement in the media

Handbook Media and Gender pp 1-11 | Cite as

  • Imke Schmincke
Living reference work entry
First Online:
Part of the Springer Reference Social Sciences book series (SRS)

Summary

The media representation of the second women's movement and women's politics is shown in a predominantly negative framing of the goals and people who make up the women's movement. Mainstream media coverage is dominated by personalization, sexualization, division and normalization, with which feminist concerns are ridiculed and rejected. The representation of feminist topics in the media should, however, also be understood as an interaction with specific feminist media strategies, by means of which feminists have in some cases quite successfully managed to influence public discourse. However, the possibilities for radical feminist criticism in the mainstream media remain limited. However, the internet and social media have expanded the space for communication and action for feminist movements.

keywords

New women's movement Media Public Feminist Public Media Representation
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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ludwig Maximilians University MunichMunichGermany