Alexander Shulgin was basically a combinatorial chemist

Exe.cut [up] able statements Poetic calculations and - Netzliteratur.net

Florian Cramer

Exe.cut[up]ablestatements

PoeticCalculusand Phantasms of the self-executing text


Cover design: Marc de Bruijn and Jorrit Sybesma, puntpixel, Rotterdam

Set with LaTeX in stamp Garamond and Frutiger.

Doctoral thesis in general and Comparative Literature, submitted

at the Peter Szondi Institute of the Free University of Berlin 2006, in the thoughts

and Analyzes from previously published lectures have been incorporated: Words Made

Flesh, 2005, Literature in the Internet, 1999, sub merge my senses: ASCII Art, recursion

and Poetry in programming languages, 2001, Concepts, Notations, Software, Art,

2002, Combinatorial Wisdom Art: Quirinus Kuhlmanns XLI. Libes kiss, 2003,

The language, a virus ?, 2002, Discordia concors: www.jodi.org, 2002, Auff some

Art upside down “: Georg Philipp Harsdörffers Frauenzimmer Talkspiele, With

perhaps the exception of rhythm: speaking, stuttering and Loops in Alvin Luciers

"I am sitting in a room", 2005, Entering the Machine and Leaving It Again: Poetics

of Software in Contemporary Art, 2005.

The author thanks everyone who invited him to give lectures at this time and with him -

also in the internet - have discussed.

Printed with the support of the ars Media.Art.Research Award 2007

electronica and of the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Linz, Austria, as well as the research program

Communication in a Digital Age of the Piet Zwart Institute of

Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University, The Netherlands.

2


Table of Contents

1 From calculus and Fantastic 7

1.1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7th

1.2 Techno word poetics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13th

2 prototypes of speech algorithms 21

2.1 Speech magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Sound poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Cut-ups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25th

2.2 Pythagorean thinking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Discordia concors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Acumen / argutia rhetoric. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Serialism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Scientific aesthetics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Pythagorean versus magical thinking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

3 Cabalism and ars combinatoria 41

3.1 Kabbalah. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

3.2 Ramón Llulls ars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

3.3 Alphabet, figurae and Orbis pictus as user interfaces. . . . 52

3.4 Combinatorial disk density. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

3.5 Exchange of words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Rhetorical word order figures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Permutation poetry from antiquity to early modern times. . . . . 60

Proteusvers seal in the 17th centuryandert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Justus Georg Schottelius ’basic words teaching. . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Georg Philipp Harsdörffers word combinations. . . . . . . . . . 74

Stanislaus Mink from Weinsheun's Proteus Poetics. . . . . . . . . . . 78

Leibniz, Dissertatio de arte combinatoria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

4 Quirinus Kuhlmann, XLI. Libes kiss 83

4.1 Mathematical permutation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

4.2 Construction of stanzas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

4.3 Root words and all their ties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

4.4 Lullian principia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

Kuhlmann's poem “after Kircherus Wandprove ". . . . . . . . 97

Antonyms and Metonymies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

3


Table of Contents

Principia relativa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

Excursus: Georges Perec and Abraham Abulafia. . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Demolition of the principia relativa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110

Principia universalia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Principia absoluta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113

4.5 Discordia concors: The “change” as the merging of opposites. . 114

4.6 Intertextuality of the poem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Harsdörffer's exchange kit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Solomonic reverse engineering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

4.7 Wisdom Art and Change gear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

To grasp people's wisdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120

Reconstruction of the change gear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Circular calculi: summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130

4.8 Rotæ Mandi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

Omnium rerum, hey! vicissitudo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

Wheel of fortune. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138

4.9 Solomonic Fama. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140

4.10 Ecstatic Algorithms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144

5 Algorithmic Total Art 149

5.1 Score and Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

La Monte Young, Composition 1960. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

George Brecht, Lamp Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150

5.2 Total combinations of script. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151

Daniel Georg Morhof, Jonathan Swift, Quirinus Kuhlmann. . . . . 151

Jorge Luis Borges, La Biblioteca de Babel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155

John Barth, The Literature of Exhaustion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

Novalis, The General Brouillon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160

Sade, Les 120 journées de Sodome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164

Stéphane Mallarmé, Livre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165

6 Language Algorithms in Structuralism and Avant-garde 167

6.1 Ferdinand de Saussure's anagram studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167

6.2 Roman Jakobson and Velimir Chlebnikov. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168

6.3 Tristan Tzara's Dadaist poetry algorithm. . . . . . . . . . . 169

6.4 Marcel Duchamp, Erratum musical. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171

6.5 Kurt Schwitters ’i-art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172

7 Stochastic Poetics 177

7.1 Concrete poetry and Information aesthetics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

Eugen Gomringer's constellations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

Max Bense's information aesthetics and "Artificial poetry". . . . . 179

4


Table of Contents

7.2 Markov chain poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

7.3 Abraham M. Moles ’permutational art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187

7.4 Stochastic Philology in Italo Calvinos Se una notte d’inverno un

viaggiatore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191

8 algorithmics as chaos and Restriction 193

8.1 John Cage's indeterminism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193

8.2 Oulipo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196

Pataphysics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196

Raymond Queneau's 100,000 Billion Poems. . . . . . . . . . 197

Oulipotic pataphysics and contraintes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199

8.3 Narrative formulas: Italo Calvino, Vladimir Propp, Plots Unlimited. . . 201

8.4 Speculative programming. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204

Psychogeographic computers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204

Adrian Ward's auto illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206

9 recursion 209

9.1 Gorgias ’praise for Helena. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209

9.2 recursion as hack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210

9.3 Recursive texts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212

9.4 Excursus: Recursion of the game at Harsdörffer. . . . . . . . . . . . . 213

9.5 Language recursion in Alvin Luciers I am sitting in a room. . . . . . . 216

9.6 Recursion of script and Narration: John Barth's Frame Tale. . . 225

10 Algorithms as an Aesthetic Figure of Thought 229

10.1 source code and ASCII Art: jodi, location. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229

10.2 Text Kitsch Worlds: Jeffrey Shaw's Legible City. . . . . . . . . . . . . 234

10.3 Source Code Ready Mades: jodi, soldier.c. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237

10.4 Programming Language Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243

ALGOL lyric of Oulipo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243

Software in concept art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245

Perl Poetry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246

jabberwocky.pl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247

jaromil, forkbomb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250

Graham Harwood, London.pl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250

10.5 Codeworks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255

Alan Sondheim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258

11 mez, _Viro.Logic Condition] [ing] [1.1_ 263

11.1 Text analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263

11.2 Poetics of Contagion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274

5


Table of Contents

12 Artificial Intelligence, Poetry Machines and her failure 279

12.1 Athanasius Kircher and Quirinus Kuhlmann. . . . . . . . . . . . . 280

12.2 John Searle's Chinese Room. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283

12.3 Georges Perec, The Machine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285

12.4 Hans-Magnus Enzensberger's poetry machine. . . . . . . . . . . . 287

12.5 Ferdinand Schmatz and Franz-Josef Czernin, POE. . . . . . . . . 290

13 Conclusions 295

13.1 media? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295

13.2 Language and Font . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297

13.3 hypertext? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300

13.4 Systematisation and text-theoretical implications. . . . . . . . 302

13.5 Algorithms and Fantastic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305

6


1 From calculus and Fantastic

1.1 Introduction

:(){ :|:& };:

jaromil, forkbomb 1

From magic spells to computer program code 2, writing is itself

performs, both technique and phantasm. That writing is "not just signs,

also technology " and "Also composed as a calculus" and therefore formally used operationally

The philosopher Sybille Krämer provides above all for history

of mathematics firmly. 3 As this work aims to show, this also applies to literature

the calculated and algorithmic language. Krämer defines calculus as

"A manufacturing specification, according to which from a limited set of characters

an unlimited number of character configurations can be produced ”. 4 this

the partly implied, partly explicit principle is also more anagrammatic and

word permutative seals. The connection to the computer is obvious,

because, according to Krämer, "such a symbolic system serves as a machine,

the character configurations generated. A machine that is not a device that defines something

Place in space and Takes up time, rather just stands on paper. A

, symbolic machine ‘or more precisely: a, syntactic machine“ ‘. 5 That it is not

just a math and Writing, but also a literary tradition more symbolic

Machines exist is the thesis of this work. Your subject is thus bordered

on the one hand from general rule poetics and on the other hand of fantastic narrative prose,

which deals metaphorically with drawing machines, but they are not

technically conceptualized. It is primarily about seals that are self-sufficient

1 See Chapter 10.4, p. 250 of this work.

2 For the literary history of language magic see Robert Stockhammer, Zaubertexte. Berlin:

Akademie-Verlag, 2000.

3 Sybille Krämer, Scripture Operating Room. In: Gernot Grube, Werner Kogge and Sybille Kramer

(Ed.), Scripture. Munich: Fink, 2005, p. 29. Sybille Krämer, Calculable Reason. Berlin, New

York: Walter de Gruyter, 1991, p. 90 speaks of the "operational [n] use of mathematical

Symbols ".

4 Sybille Krämer, Symbolic Machines. Scientific Book Society: Darmstadt, 1988,

P. 99.

5 Krämer, Vernunft, p. 92, remainder of the quote: “Since Turing his model of a 'Turing machine' has been a mathematical one

Developed a more precise definition of the algorithm and since we have computers as realizations

By understanding Turing machines, we know that every syntactic machine also goes through

a real machine can be simulated ”.

7


1 From calculus and Fantastic

Practically reflecting leading writings by making them both technical and

to carry out speculative-reflexively in oneself.

This literary history also provides reverse information Calculusand Algorithms,

namely that syntactic procedures cannot be separated from their connotations

and semantic inscriptions; of utopias and Dystopias, metaphysics,

Ontologies, phantasms and contradicting imaginations

of the self-executing word. 6 Your programs are also programming

and poetic, speculative, parodic programs, including

the subjective-physical and phantasmagoric overgrowth algorithmic

Scripture in programming language poetry and Codeworks. The transformation

from languages ​​to syntactic machines ”7 also happens in poetic imagination

internal and outside of the conventional system of "literature", so for

Example also in software and Programming culture, in the concept of the "hack" and

Writing forms such as Perl Poetry, which this work should also take into account. 8th

This "transformation of languages ​​into syntactic machines" takes place in

of literature neither with electronic computer poetry, nor with the lullistic combinatorial

Poetry of the early modern age, but, among others, Friedrich

Rückert, Franz Dornseiff and Ulrich Ernst have shown 9 since antiquity

in mixed and permutative language games and Seals of both European,

as well as non-European provenance. 10 The combinatorial poetry

the early modern period is based on earlier literary suggestions

Gustav René Hocke 11 by Alfred Liede, Ulrich Ernst, Erika Greber, among others

and Anita Traninger has been extensively researched (albeit a systematic one

Philology, for example the Proteusvers poetry, is still pending). 12 The lullistic

6 In contrast to a diagnosis such as that made by Holger Schulze, Das aleatorische Spiel. Munich: Fink,

2000, p. 33, from the view of artistic modernism and concrete poetry of poetry combinations

exhibits in total: “The artists stylize themselves as calculating without emotion

Art engineers or bureaucrats ”.

7 Krämer, Vernunft, p. 92, see also Sybille Krämer, Calculus as representation. To the genesis of the

operational symbolism in modern times. In: Hansjörg Rheinberger, Michael Hagner and Bettina

Truig-Schmidt (Ed.), Spaces of Knowledge. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1997, p. 112: “Operative

Fonts are graphic symbol systems with a double function: They are a medium for

iosmorphic representation of a certain range of objects and at the same time a tool

for (symbolic) operation with these objects ”.

8 See Chapter 10.4, p. 246 of this work.

9 Franz Dornseiff, The Alphabet in Mysticism and Magic. Leipzig, Berlin: Teubner, 1925; Friedrich

Rückert, grammar, poetics and Persian rhetoric. Wiesbaden, Osnabrück (Gotha): Publishing bookstore

Otto Cell, Otto Harrassowitz Antiquarian Book Shop, 1966 (1874); Ulrich Ernst, permutation

as a principle of poetry. In: Poetica, [1992], No. 24.

10 The latest in the second century BCandThe published Chinese I Ching is a supplement here

and prominently mentioned, see p. 193.

11 Gustav René Hocke, Mannerism in Literature. Hamburg: Rowohlt, 1959.

12 Alfred Liede, Poetry as a Game. Berlin and New York: De Gruyter, 1992 (1963/66); Seriously, permutation

and partly also in Jeremy Adler and Ulrich Ernst, text as a figure. Visual posie of the

8


1.1 Introduction

and Kabbalistic linguistic thinking has about poetry in the narrower sense

also Wilhelm Schmidt-Biggemann, John Neubauer, Umberto, among others

Eco and Andreas Kilcher examines. 13 Opposite this, with three centuriesanderten

historical distance of the subject, monographs to the aleatoric

Modern Arts, 14 to the more recent computer and Internetpoetry by Roberto

Simanowski, Thomas Kamphusmann, David Link, Saskia Reither and Christiane

Heibach 15 and N. Katherine Hayles ’Readings of Electronic Literature. 16

Almost all recent monographs of early modern combinatorial poetry refer to this

in digressions on electronic poetry, leave it at - mine

View: questionable (see chapter 13.3) - references to "hypertext" literature, 17

while the monographs of the electronic Network literature just as cursory

mention combinatorial poems as prototypes of computer poetry, 18 without

that connections and Differences would be examined more closely. Unhappy

seems to me also the one that was widespread in these works (from me earlier, too

related) term of "digital poetry" or "digital poetry" as each

Literature that is listed alphabetically and based on analog parameters such as [graphical]

Typeface or [phonetical] Loudness not justified, already digital,

namely is stored in discrete characters. 19 Because digitization is nothing else

Ancient to modern. Weinheim: VCH, 3 1990 (1987); Erika Greber, Textile Texts. Cologne, Weimar,

Vienna: Böhlau, 2002; Anita Traninger, Effortless Science. Lullism and Rhetoric in the

German-speaking countries of the early modern period. Munich: Fink, 2001. A concise definition

Combinatorial literature formulates Greber, Textile Texte, p. 13.

13 Wilhelm Schmidt-Biggemann, Topica universalis. A model story more humanistic and baroque

Science. Hamburg: Meiner, 1983; Wilhelm Schmidt-Biggemann, Philosophia perennis.

Frankfurt / M .: Suhrkamp, ​​1998; John Neubauer, symbolism and symbolic logic. The idea

the ars combinatoria in modern poetry. Munich: Fink, 1978; Umberto Eco, The Search

after the perfect language. Munich: Hanser, 1994; Andreas Kilcher, The Language Theory of

Kabbalah as an aesthetic paradigm. Stuttgart, Weimar: Metzler, 1998; Andreas Kilcher, mathesis

and poiesis. The Encyclopedia of Literature 1600 to 2000. Munich: Fink, 2003.

14 Schulze, The aleatoric game

15 Roberto Simanowski, Interfictions. Frankfurt / M .: Suhrkamp, ​​2002; Thomas Kamphusmann, literature

on the calculator. Stuttgart, Weimar: Metzler, 2002; David Link, Poetry Machines / Machine Poetry.

Dissertation, Humboldt University Berlin, Berlin, 2002; Saskia Reither, computer poetry.

Bielefeld: transcript, 2003; Christiane Heibach, literature in electronic space. Frankfurt / M .:

Suhrkamp, ​​2003.

16 N. Katherine Hayles, Writing Machines. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2002, N. Katherine

Hayles, My Mother Was a Computer. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2005.

17 Concerning this, Reither, Computerpoesie, p. 12: “Although different forms appear at the same time

who developed computer poetry, takes place in scientific research

Computer literature almost exclusively in the context of 'hypertext' and the ,Network literature

instead, with the effect of a short circuit: electronic literature = hypertext = Network literature“. –

However, from my point of view, Reither undermines a short circuit of computer poetry in general

with electronic computer poetry in particular.

18 For example Simanowski, Interfictions or, with his cover illustration by Georg Philipp Harsdörffers

Denckring der Teutschen language, Kamphusmann, literature.

19 An easily understandable, theoretical definition of the analog and of the digital formulated

9


1 From calculus and Fantastic

res as abstract means in writing, are based on culture-apocalyptic diagnoses

from the supposed death of the text in the internet on a mixture of vulgar

McLuhan and technical ignorance.

This work, however, does not just want to fill the gap between the philologies of the early modern period

Poetry combinatorics and contemporary computer poetry,

but also focuses its subject differently: Because it is algorithmically executed

Regarding language as the material of poetry, it does not focus on the digital,

nor electronic writing per se, 20 nor game poetics in general,

since none of them necessarily constructed symbolic-imaginary machines

or reflected. 21 Electronic seals,

which, instead of reflecting algorithms in their language, are audio-visual and

Continuing collaborative poetry on the network computer 22 or as poetry machines

reinventing the ars combinatoria naively, without any literary-historical awareness. 23 Also

she is not interested in a “media archeological” history of technology discourse like her

Bernhard J. Dotzler and Stefan Rieger for writing and Machine calculations both

the early modern times as well as the modern times. 24 That, like shopkeeper

writes that the “computer [...] - like its programmability (, gramma‘: Greek.

Letter) also leads one to expect - a writing machine “25 is - which, however, is only

applies to digital, not analogue computers - this is the initial consideration

Study insofar as they are the literatures and contemplating the poetics of those grammata,

that are written in programming and vice versa. 26th

Nelson Goodman, The Languages ​​of Art. Indianapolis, Cambridge: Hackett, 1976 (1968), 159-

164; Reither, Computerpoesie, formulates the same objection to the term "digital poetry"

P. 12, footnote 4. For examples of the term "digital poetry" see e.g. Friedrich Block,

Christiane Heibach and Karin Wenz (Ed.), P0es1s. Aesthetics of digital poetry. Ostfildern-Ruit:

Hatje Cantz, 2004; although its co-editor Friedrich Block elsewhere in a poem

from photographed finger marks the concept of the digital radically to its word meaning

and linking letters and Digits - returns.

20 Kamphusmann, Literatur already covers the latter well.

21 See the many forms of poetry in Liede, Poetry as a game, Ernst, Permutation, Schulze, Das

aleatoric game and Greber, Textile Texts that lack algorithms due to insufficient formalization

perform, such as the bout-rimés, of which Greber, Textile Texte, p. 429, nevertheless

rightly writes that they formed "a previously unrecognized combinatorial genre"; see also Neubauer,

Symbolism, pp. 140ff.

22 On audiovisual electronic poetry, see especially Simanowski, Interfictions, on collaborative

Vernetzung see Heibach, literature in electronic space.

23 Link examines their modern IT development history from Eliza to SHRDLU,

Poetry machines, their programming in Oulipo, among others and concrete poetry Reither, computer poetry.

24 Bernhard J. Dotzler, paper machines. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1996; Bernhard J. Dotzler, discourse

and Medium. On the archeology of computer culture. Munich: Fink, 2006 and Stefan Rieger,

To save. Notice. The Artificial Intelligences of the Baroque. Munich: Fink, 1997.

25 shopkeepers, Calculus as representation, p. 172.

26 In this context, I understand “computer” in the general informatics sense as well as electronic and

non-electronic, existing and hypothetically imagined computing machines.

10


1.1 Introduction

In addition to literary combinatorics, she therefore also examines stochastic, recursive ones

as well as simulated algorithmic processes in poetry and treated for the first time

systematically the Network literature the Codeworks, about which so far only on the verge of

Net art secandarliterature 27 or, in individual analyzes, elective relatives netzartistic

Work 28 has been written. With a few exceptions, close

readings of algorithmic poetry of both early modern times and modern times.

Quirinus Kuhlmann's combinatorial Sonett, for example, is often quoted,

but seldom analyzed beyond its combinatorial functioning. Extensive

Readings especially from Kuhlmann's XLI. Libes-kiss and mez '(Mary Anne

Breezes) contemporary _Viro.Logic Condition] [ing] [1.1_ work are the attempt to

do not use their poetry as illustrative material for algorithmic grammata

Example of a technology and To look at the history of science, but also

to read as literature that writes with algorithmically executable script.

The thesis is that this feasibility is a Grandaspect of poetry and so,

like phonetic poetry the phonetische and visual poetry the graphetic dimension

extrapolated from language, poetic Calculusand Algorithms their formal dimension

exhibits. 29 Every derivation of computer poetry from "new media"

diametrically opposed. So this work is methodical, though not always

in the examined material, 30 without media theory and without the terms "medium"

and "Media". 31

Conversely, the question arises whether previous literature and Text theories carried out algorithmically

Have texts on your invoice. A general language combinatorial -

selection and syntagmatic arrangement of elements of a character set -,

is Grandlocation of Saussure's Linguistics and later Jacobson's novel structuralist

Poetology. 32 From Saussure's model of language as a system of difference as well

his paranoid-cabbalistic combinatorial analysis in the anagram studies

33 the intertextuality theory is derived around 1967, the former of its speculative

27 Tilman Baumgärtel, net.art. Nuremberg: Verlag für modern art, 1999; Valentina Djordjevic, word processor

and Screen designer. In: Institute for Modern Art Nuremberg (Ed.), netz.art.

Yearbook 98-99. Nürnberg: Verlag für Moderne Kunst, 1999; Inke Arns, texts that move:

on the performativity of programming codes in net art. In: Inke Arns et al. (Ed.),

Kinetographies. Bielefeld: Aisthesis, 2004 (2001).

28 Lev Manovich, Cinema by Numbers: ASCII Films by Vuk Cosic. In: Vuk Cosic (Ed.), Contemporary

ASCII. Ljubljana: Galerija Š.O.U. Kapelica, 2000; Hayles, Writing Machines, pp. 46-63 above

Talan Memmotts From Nexia to Perplexia.

29 How it manifests itself e.g. in numerical proportions in the composition of the text, cf.

E.g. Erika Greber, Wortwebstühle or: The combinatorial texture of Sonetts. Theses on a

new concept of the genre. In: Susi Kotzinger and Gabriele Rippl (ed.), Characters between

Plain text and Arabesque. Amsterdam, Atlanta: Rodopi, 1994.

30 See p. 18

31 For a critique of the term media see Chapter 13.1, p. 295 of this work.

32 Ferdinand de Saussure, Grandquestions of linguistics. Berlin, New York: de Gruyter, 2001

(1916); Roman Jakobson, Linguistics and Poetics. In: Poetics. Frankfurt / M .: Suhrkamp, ​​1993 (1960).

33 Jean Starobinski, Les mots sous les mots. Les anagrams de Ferdinand de Saussure. Paris: Galli-

11


1 From calculus and Fantastic

ven combinatorics. 34 Genuine, albeit unintentional, successor

of the anagram studies are C. Oelschläger's study of Shakespeare-Bacon monuments

from 1938, 35 the inscriptions of various Shakespeare monuments as gematrisch

coded secret messages for the identity of Shakespeare and Francis Bacons suggests

as well as the self-published True Crime book Times 17 by the American Germanist

Gareth Penn, who meticulously tries to prove that this remains unexplained to this day

The Zodiac Killer series of murders has been a Kabbalistic Land Art work of art

is, whose artist signature, among other things, by times and Degrees of longitude

the crimes have been coded. 36

These examples show the expansion of poetic algorithms into fantasy.

Renate Lachmann is the first literary scholar to propose, not just

what is described, but also ways of writing as characteristics of fantastic literature

consider. 37 Your concept of the fantastic includes "aleatoric" and "Computer Art"

even explicitly one. 38 Lachmann writes: "Anagrammatism,

ars combinatoria and the amimetic constructivism in the avant-garde of the

20th centuryanderts represent the phenomenon of contingency conceptually and structurally,

to make it go away Calculation goes into all three forms

and Magic, math and Mysticism together. Literature appears as a place

the contingency authorization ". 39 Conversely, it follows from this that algorithms

andCalculus are not just syntactic. The subject of this study are therefore

also less technical processes than - in the sense of an aesthetic anthropology

- the eccentric imagination that attaches to it and sometimes utopian,

ecstatic, phantasmagoric or ironic.

Yet this fantastic is not limited to contingency phenomena and

his literature does not focus on aleatoric, play- and Nonsense poetry. 40 On syntactic

mard, 1971.

34Like a text file whose virally executable macros are removed for security reasons; Despite the

revolutionary impetus of the early intertextuality theory e.g. in Julia Kristeva, Zu einer Semiologie

of the paragrams. In: Helga Gallas (Ed.), Structuralism as an interpretative method.

Darmstadt / Neuwied: Luchterhand, 1972.

35 C. Oelschläger, Shakespeare-Bacon-Monuments. Würzburg: Konrad Triltsch, 1938.

36 Gareth Penn, Times 17. The Amazing Story of the Zodiac Murders in California and Massachusetts

1966-1981. San Francisco: Selbstverlag, 1987. Such combinatorial-paranoid hermeneutics are necessary

so not at all of the fictionalization as in Umberto Eco, Il pendolo di Foucault. Milano:

Bompiani, 1988.

37 Renate Lachmann, Narrated Fantasticism. Frankfurt / M .: Suhrkamp, ​​2002, p. 10: the fantastic

“Exceeds the requirements of mimetic grammar [...]. The counter- or rather cryptogrammatics

the fantastic allows itself semiotic excesses, hypertrophies, extravagances

and connects to traditions of the ornamental, arabesques and Grotesques or develops them

actually only ”. On the same page is of its "termination of the fictional display rules"

the speech.

38 Lachmann, Phantastik, p. 118.

39 Lachmann, Phantastik, p. 125.

40 Cf. Songs, poetry as a game, which is already committed to "nonsense poetry" in the subtitle, as well as

12


1.1 Introduction

Level encompasses more than just combinatorial algorithms and aleatoric

Procedure, 41 and against the experience of contingency are deterministic designs,

Metaphysics against or alongside technism, games against ontologizations

of order and chance, delusions of interpretation versus antihermeneutics, traditionalism

against anti-tradition; Opposites, which are often based on outwardly identical shapes

and Fix calculations. The very contradictions of the imagination are

it that is the fantastic and make up the speculative aspect of this literature, their common

Denominator and Fear image of text executing itself.

Schulze, The Aleatoric Game.

41 cf.the part of this work from p. 167, see Schulze, Das aleatorische Spiel.

13


1 From calculus and Fantastic

1.2 Techno word poetics

Date: Tue, Jan 14, 2003 21:47:42 +1 100

From: mez

To: [email protected]

Subject: Re: OPPO.S [able] .I.T [humbs] ION !!

Hello Arch.E.typal T [Claims of the n] ext W [h] orl.d

-------------------- (mo.dueling 1.1) -------------------

N.terr.ing the net.wurk ---

:: du n.OT enter _here_ with fal [low] se genera.tiffs + pathways poking

especially Kant [c] littoral tomb [+ age].

:: re.peat [bogging] + b d. [on the l] am.ned.

:: yr p [non-E-] lastic hollow play.jar. [*] istic [tock] met [riculation.s] hods

sit badly in yr vetoed m [-c] outh.

Pr [t] inting ---

:: spamnation. .r [l] u [re] ins. .Alles.

Exe.cut[up]ablestatements---

:: do knot a p.arse.r .make.

:: reti.cu [t] la [ss] te. yr. text.je [llied] wells .awe. .r [b] ust.

R [l] un [ge] ning the pro.gram [mar] ---

:: re.a [vataresque] ct [ors | actrestles] + provoke @ yr response per [b] il [e].

:: con.Seed.quenches r 2 b [s | w] allowed.

:: big boots make filth k.arm [N limb.ic cyst.M] a.

42

A text in the mask of a computer program in version number 1.1

["(Mo.dueling 1.1)"], sent by the Australian Internet-Artist mez

(Mary-Anne Breeze) in January 2003 netzcultural mailing lists: How a

Source code transformed and expands "mo.dueling" to "modeling", "module"

and "Dueling". With modeling, module and Dueling are the parameters of one

Environment named in the people and Programs with each other and among themselves

act linguistically. A network is entered (“N.terr.ing the net.wurk "),

which is also a slang named work of art ("wurk"). The text emulates and

travels the welcoming message of an Internet-Chat server serving its users

warns against logging in under a false name (":: you n.OT enter _here_

with fal [low] se genera.tiffs + "). But the warning is "offtopic" ("OT"), wrong too

be, is allowed ("fallow") and leads to good company ("fallows"). Identity can

are machine-generated (“generatiffs”) such as image files, “tiffs”, which are tagged in

Image File Format can be saved with the file extension .tif or .tiff. It is one

Text world that operates as "T [Claims of the n] ext W [h] orl.d", a utopian promise for the future

and is at the same time occupied by pornography and sex: it is a world of whores

("W [h] orl.d"), simultaneously literal and clitoral ("[c] littoral"), empty ("vacant"), Kantian

("Kant") and genital ("cunt"). Repeated violation ("re.peat [bogging]")

42 mez, OPPO.S [able] .I.T [humbs] ION !! 1 2003.

14


1.2 Techno word poetics

breaking the rules leads to damnation ("b damned") or landing, depending on the reading

("On the land").

The identity masquerade in the network is hollow, plastic, elastic or inelastic

(“P [non-E-] lastic”) plagiarism (“plagiaristic methods”) or play

("Play-jar-istic"). The text not only describes this, but is it at the same time;

he speaks in simultaneous meta and Object language; firstly in the pun "playgiarism",

the American writer Raymond Federman as a key concept in 1976

his poetics, 43 second, in his para-combinatorial and

- Algorithmically expanding words, thirdly as a net art work that is simultaneous

is sent via various e-mail distribution lists. It is "spamnation", unsolicited

sent mass viral mail that was ruined (".r [l] u [re] ins. .all." read as

"Ruins all") and Lures victims (".r [l] u [re] ins. .All." Read as "lure in all").

The notation of this and other texts by mez emulate syntactic conventions

of computer programming languages and -Command line environments,

Wildcards and regular expressions such as "B [ua] ch" as simultaneous

Search term for "book" and "Bach" or "B [ua] * ch" as a regular search term

for "book", "Bach" and "Belly". 44 In mez ’artificial language" mezangelle ", whose

Name itself a hybrid of "mez" and "Mangle" - to mix - is to serve

however, these quasi-regular expressions fail to find existing ones

Text, but rather the creation of multiple texts from one text, which is thus

how to read a source code. With this source code in turn computernetz-,

Protocol- and Describes source codes, it short-circuits itself with itself. But

he doesn't talk about technical self-reference. Just as he himself is an impure one,

is a confused, not strictly computer-syntactic code, but a semantized one

Hybrid of formal and Colloquial language, he describes a life on the net as

physical experience of a fantastically rampant mixture of programming

and Subjectivity. The text calls this "Arch.E.typal T [Claims of the

n] ext W [h] orl.d ”, readable among other things as“ archetypal text world ”,“ arch. Claims of

the next world " and "Archetypical text whor (e)". hardware and Software architectures,

often abbreviated as "arch" in computer slang, merge with archetypes,

the world to come with a text world. Littered slang and sexualized language

identify the mezangelle as a code that does not unfold on machines,

but in the human imagination; one imagination, however, the machines

and includes human bodies on an equal footing. In contrast to cryptographic

and The semantics of what is coded do not lie outside the formal code

Codes, but is directly inscribed on it. Syntax is semantized, semantics

noted as program syntax.

43Raymond Federman, Imagination as Playgiarism. To unfinished paper. In: New Literary History,

7 [1976], No. 3.

Loss Pequeño describes the practical poetic use of regular expressions for grep poems

Glazier, Digital Poetics. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2002, p. 97.

15


1 From calculus and Fantastic

The results are, as it says in the text, "Exe.cut[up]ablestatements": Statement,

which can be para-machined that look like program files

(the “.exe” suffix of program files in the DOS operating systems and Windows

travels here in a "Exe."-Prefix) and at the same time cutups are, text collages

and - assemblies based on the model of William S. Burroughs. 45 You let yourself

do not automatically convert or parse into commands, as it is called in computer science

becomes: ":: do knot a p.arse.r .make". Because the logical operator “not” is already clumped together

phonetisch to a knot, "knot", and the parser becomes typographical

to the "ass". Through rhetorical procedures - paronomasia, phonetical homonymy,

graphical ellipse and semantic obscenum - the mezangelle generates one

Excess of no longer machine-readable characters. Conversely, it forces

Readers' brains in the modus operandi of a semantic parser. Not just solves

she out, she also describes him: “:: reti.cu [t] la [ss] te. yr. text.je [llied] wells .awe.

.r [b] ust "," vernetnt / cuts / stabs your text jewels / gelled text

Sources are rust [, rust ‘] / robust [, rbust‘] / kaputt [, bust ‘]“.

The "Exe.cut[up]ablestatements”Corresponds to the expression“ R [l] un [ge] ning

the pro.gram [mar] - ", resolvable among other things as" running the program "

("Run the computer program") and "Lunging the programmer"

("Nudging the programmer"). As a box word of program,

Gram and Grammar as well as phonetical homonym of "programmer"

"pro.gram [mar]" merges human and language and Software. subjectivity

changes under these conditions and mutates like the code. In

":: re.a [vataresque] ct [ors | actrestles]" are the words react / act / actor / actress

/ restless / avataresque included. They describe a subject who is under a

self-chosen electronic identity - an "avatar" - goes online, there

potentially causing mischief ("provoke @ yr response per [b] il [e].") and Before

Consequences are warned (":: con.Seed.quenches r 2 b [s | w] allowed"). speaker