You can grow mushrooms in a terrarium

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  • Hello everybody...

    I'm new here and have a question right away:

    I am a passionate terrarist and I also keep a theraphosa apophysis, the largest tarantula in the world. Mine is not yet fully grown and lives in a 20x30x20cm pool that only has a 5x2cm wide ventilation slot at the top at the back.

    Now all of a sudden small mushrooms grew there, which I immediately removed to protect my animal.
    A friend from our forum said the mushrooms didn't bother me and I could leave it there ... Well, said done, some vegetation can't harm my protégé, I thought, and let it grow.

    On the day after next, then the following picture (see attachment):
    My T. apophysis full of spores and the bottom white ... Well, she probably wasn't that fond of I guess ...

    I now have the following thought: I could relocate the spider and use this spore-strewn area to grow mushrooms, if they are edible. I don't know how it is with the determination of mushrooms, with scoprions and spines it is not so easy on the basis of pictures ... but here are the two pictures that I have available ...

    Greetings Maschello

    images

    • Pilzophysis.JPG
  • Hello Maschello,

    Welcome to the Forum


    ... I don't know how it is with the determination of mushrooms, with scoprions and spines it is not so easy on the basis of pictures ...


    Yes, it is often not easy to identify fungi by photo, and in some cases it is impossible, and then only the microscope can help

    Regarding your mushrooms: I suspect this is heading here Pleated umbrellas (Leucocoprinus spec.), Do you have any other pictures at hand? Perhaps you would have to microscope the mushrooms for an exact determination and if it were to be folded umbrellas they are not poisonous (unfortunately, I don't know to what extent they are harmful to your animals) but these mushrooms are not suitable for food purposes.

    best regards,
    Andreas

  • Hello Maschello,


    Now all of a sudden small mushrooms grew there, which I immediately removed to protect my animal.
    A friend from our forum said the mushrooms didn't bother me and I could leave it there ... Well, no sooner said than done, some vegetation can't harm my protégé, I thought, and let it grow.

    On the day after next, then the following picture (see attachment):
    My T. apophysis full of spores and the bottom white ... Well, she probably wasn't that fond of I guess ...

    Wonderful, your protégé survived the spore attack and can now be addressed as "Theraphosa apophysis forma pruinosus".

    But now some more serious comments about your mushrooms:

    - In my opinion, it is undoubtedly one

    "Faltenschirmling" (genus Leucocoprinus);

    ---> Fungus species introduced from the tropics, which in Europe + were only found in greenhouses, flower pots, and also in terrariums, i.e. inside buildings and not outdoors.

    - In my opinion, it is not possible to determine the species based on your pictures. You show pictures where I am not sure what color the scales in the middle of the hat are (blackish to dark brown or with distinct purple tones). In addition, I cannot evaluate details of the slats, the stem, etc.
    ---> Doesn't matter: Even if you were to show these details in an assessable way, the micro features (at 1000x magnification) would also have to be checked for a reliable identification of the species.

    - Are primarily eligible
    (a) L. lilacinogranulosus, L. ianthinus with purple hues
    (b) L. brebissonii, L. heinemannii with blackish to very dark brown shades
    ------------


    I now have the following thought: I could relocate the spider and use this area covered with spores to grow mushrooms, if they are edible. I don't know how it is with the determination of mushrooms, with scoprions and spines it is not so easy on the basis of pictures ... but here are the two pictures that I have available ...

    - You can forget about mushroom cultivation:
    (a) Folded parasols are traded in Europe as "inedible, not an edible mushroom". Cases of poisoning are, in my opinion, not known so far.
    ---> No wonder: Who comes up with the idea of ​​eating such thin-fleshed mushrooms (90% water)?

    (b) Occasional intolerances are reported from America.
    ---> mushroom-found-t-1858.html
    --------------------------

    - If you have any further questions ---> just follow up!

    greetings
    Gerd

    PS .:
    - The genus interests me and I would be grateful if you would send me some fruit bodies.

    ---> I'll send you a message with my address.

  • Hello Gerd ... I would like to send you my mushrooms by post, do I have to do anything? Do you dry them or let them dry and preserve them in some way?

    I have no idea where they came from ... nothing in the terrarium comes from the tropics except for the spider and it is guaranteed not to bring in any fungal spores, it is a German offspring.

    I would like to try to grow edible mushrooms together with my spider ... Do you have any advice?

    Maybe Gerd can send me some spores in return for the mushrooms, that would be great ...!?!

    Greetings Maschello

  • Hello Machello,


    Hello Gerd ... I would like to send you my mushrooms by post, do I have to do anything? Do you dry them or let them dry and preserve them in some way?

    - Thank you very much, I'm curious to see which wrinkled ink has nested in you.

    - About Shipping:
    ---> Just put a few fruit bodies between white paper, put them in a normal envelope, and off you go.


    I have no idea where they came from ... nothing in the terrarium comes from the tropics except for the spider and it is guaranteed not to bring in any fungal spores, it is a German offspring.

    - Wrinkles were mostly introduced more than 100 years ago and have proven themselves as warmth-loving species in "tropical houses, greenhouses, flower pots and terrariums, etc." nested.

    - They no longer need spore supplies from the tropics. Even a few fruiting bodies produce huge amounts of spores that are spread by the wind).


    I would like to try to grow edible mushrooms together with my spider ... Do you have any advice?

    Maybe Gerd can send me some spores in return for the mushrooms, that would be great ...!?!

    - Unfortunately I cannot give you any advice (I have never dealt with mushroom cultivation). However, I know from the literature that the cultivation of mycelium only works under sterile laboratory conditions and suitable culture media. Anything else would be pure coincidence.

    ---> But, one of our mushroom growers may be able to say something about this.

    greetings
    Gerd

  • Thanks Gerd ...

    Are you telling me that tons of mushroom species can grow in my terrarium, but edible mushrooms need it sterile to grow? They also grow in nature and it's not sterile ... I'll send you the mushrooms ...

    Greetings Marcel

  • Can't anyone help me?

  • Hello Marcel,

    Unfortunately, mushroom cultivation is not that easy. In potting compost, only parapets, smaller inks and similar inedible species grow.
    Most edible mushrooms need trees as a symbiotic partner. The few species that can be grown only grow on straw, wood or special compost. Mushrooms, for example, need a special substrate that is usually prepared from straw and horse manure. Its manufacture is a science in itself ...
    Sterility is not always necessary in mushroom cultivation, but it is helpful so that mold, microbes, worms and insects do not destroy the harvest. Unlike in the wild, you create a monoculture in which pests have no natural enemies.

    If you are interested in mushroom cultivation, have a look around here under 'Mushroom cultivation'. You can find more information at Kulturpilz.de.

    Greetings, Carsten

  • I can also put a piece of wood or something in the terrarium, that's not how it is ... What conditions should such a fungus need, apart from moist conditions and a breeding ground?

    I mean, of course there are demanding and less demanding ... but surely there is an edible mushroom that I can bring there, right?

    I mean the temperatures of 25 ° C and the high humidity must please some mushroom :(

  • What conditions should such a mushroom need?

    Hi Maschellodioma,

    maybe it would be a good idea to first familiarize yourself with the topic a little more intensively:

    Pilzzucht.eu - grow mushrooms

    ;)Warm wishes,
    Meinhard

    You gain experience like mushrooms: individually and with the feeling that the matter is not entirely secure.

  • I don't want to grow them commercially or in large quantities ... and I don't want to become a great mushroom expert either ... But even as a non-expert, I can simply say that any edible mushroom should meet these requirements ... at least that I can pick and eat one from time to time ... It doesn't have to be boletus ... In the forest they also grow without agar agar ... although it would be no problem to provide half of the terrarium with another substrate, like I said, I'm relatively flexible ... just need spurs and someone has to briefly explain to me what I should do there ...

    Greetings Maschello

  • Just do the following:
    Take a small, clean, screw-topped jar and cut a piece of brown corrugated cardboard so that you can put it inside. Then you buy fresh oyster mushrooms in the supermarket. Hold the cardboard briefly under the tap and let hot water run through the slats. Then you shake out the excess water and peel off one of the outer layers of cardboard. The cardboard now goes into the glass, corrugated layer on top. Now you put pieces of stalk from the oyster mushrooms on top and cover them with the piece of cardboard that you removed earlier, close the lid and wait a few days. When mycelium grows, you can get wooden dowels, soak for a day, boil, place in the jar, close the lid again and wait.
    If everything goes well and nothing goes moldy, you can inoculate a piece of wood with the dowels after a few weeks.

    Greetings, Carsten

    PS: It's better to put several glasses on in case something goes wrong.